“Quitting Is A Virtue”: Why This Decision-Making Expert Says That Quitting Can Be A Growth Strategy

Must read

Joe Biden pays tribute to victims of California mass shootings: ‘As a nation, we have to be there for them’

 President Joe Biden led a moment of silence at the White House on Thursday in honor of the victims of separate shootings that killed 11 people...

FDA pushes to make COVID-19 vaccinations easier. At the top of the list: One annual booster instead of two

The U.S. is poised to make COVID-19 vaccinations more like a yearly flu shot, a major shift in strategy despite a long list of...

Hasbro to cut 1,000 jobs as the pandemic-era toy-buying boom cools now that kids are back in school

Hasbro, one of the world’s largest toymakers, said it would cut 15% of its workforce, or about 1,000 jobs, after a disappointing holiday shopping...

A chemical plant’s polluting poisoned a generation of children in a small town. The settlement that the state just made has residents up in...

In hindsight, it’s clear that something was very wrong in this suburban town at the Jersey Shore, where many people worked at or lived...

This story appears in the October 2022 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe »

When successful entrepreneurs tell their stories, they often speak of perseverance: Things were hard, but they did not give up. It’s an inspiring message, but it can also be misleading. “In order to succeed, you are going to have to stick to hard things,” says Annie Duke, a former professional poker player who teaches decision strategies in the executive education program at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. “But also, in order to succeed, you’re going to have to quit the things that aren’t worth pursuing.”

Courtesy of Annie Duke

Quitting has a bad reputation, and Duke is out to clear its name. It’s why she wrote her new book, Quit. “We should think of quitting as a virtue, a characteristic that we want to develop,” she says. That’s especially true for entrepreneurs, who may equate quitting with failure — and therefore may ignore the warning signs that their business is in trouble, in turn wasting their investors’ money, their employees’ efforts, and their own time in finding more promising ways forward. Here, Duke explains how and when it’s best to quit…or at least, to leave the option on the table.

More articles

Latest article

Joe Biden pays tribute to victims of California mass shootings: ‘As a nation, we have to be there for them’

 President Joe Biden led a moment of silence at the White House on Thursday in honor of the victims of separate shootings that killed 11 people...

FDA pushes to make COVID-19 vaccinations easier. At the top of the list: One annual booster instead of two

The U.S. is poised to make COVID-19 vaccinations more like a yearly flu shot, a major shift in strategy despite a long list of...

Hasbro to cut 1,000 jobs as the pandemic-era toy-buying boom cools now that kids are back in school

Hasbro, one of the world’s largest toymakers, said it would cut 15% of its workforce, or about 1,000 jobs, after a disappointing holiday shopping...

A chemical plant’s polluting poisoned a generation of children in a small town. The settlement that the state just made has residents up in...

In hindsight, it’s clear that something was very wrong in this suburban town at the Jersey Shore, where many people worked at or lived...

Health effects of cannabis products are too uncertain for regulating the fast-growing market like food or supplements, FDA says

The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday there are too many unknowns about CBD products to regulate them as foods or supplements under the...